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  • Writer's pictureVinay Addanki

FY 2024 H-1B Cap Registration Process Update



As previously announced, on March 27, 2023, USCIS received enough electronic registrations during the initial registration period to reach the FY 2024 H-1B numerical allocations (H-1B cap), including the advanced degree exemption also known as the master’s cap.

We subsequently announced that we would need to select additional registrations to reach the FY 2024 numerical allocations. As of July 31, 2023, we have randomly selected, from the remaining FY 2024 registrations properly submitted, a sufficient number of registrations projected as needed to reach the cap, and have notified all prospective petitioners with selected registrations from this round of selection that they are eligible to file an H-1B cap-subject petition for the beneficiary named in the applicable selected registration. USCIS selected 77,600 registrations in the second selection for the FY 2024 H-1B cap. In December, USCIS announced the receipt of a sufficient number of petitions needed to reach the congressionally mandated caps for FY 2024.

During the registration period for the FY 2024 H-1B cap, USCIS saw a significant increase in the number of registrations submitted compared to prior years. Generally, we saw an increase in the number of registrations submitted, the number of registrations submitted on behalf of beneficiaries with multiple registrations, and the number of registrations submitted on behalf of unique beneficiaries with only one registration. USCIS saw upward trends in the FY 2022 and FY 2023 H-1B registration periods as well.

This chart shows registration and selection numbers for fiscal years 2021-2024 (as of July 31, 2023).

Cap Fiscal Year

Total Registrations

Eligible Registrations*

Eligible Registrations for Beneficiaries with No Other Eligible Registrations

Eligible Registrations for Beneficiaries with Multiple Eligible Registrations

Selections**

2021

274,237

269,424

241,299

28,125

124,415

2022

308,613

301,447

211,304

90,143

131,924

2023

483,927

474,421

309,241

165,180

127,600

2024

780,884

758,994

350,103

408,891

188,400

*The count of eligible registrations excludes duplicate registrations, those deleted by the prospective employer prior to the close of the registration period, and those with failed payments.

**The number of initial selections for FY 2024 – 110, 791 -- was smaller in than in prior years primarily due to (a) establishing a higher anticipated petition filing rate by selected registrants based on prior years; and (b) higher projected Department of State approvals of H-1B1 visas, which count against the H-1B cap.

Measures to Combat Fraud in the Registration Process

The large number of eligible registrations for beneficiaries with multiple eligible registrations - much larger than in previous years – has raised serious concerns that some may have tried to gain an unfair advantage by working together to submit multiple registrations on behalf of the same beneficiary. This may have unfairly increased their chances of selection. We remain committed to deterring and preventing abuse of the registration process, and to ensuring only those who follow the law are eligible to file an H-1B cap petition.

We remind the public that at the time each registration is submitted, each prospective petitioner is required to sign an attestation, under penalty of perjury, that:

  • All of the information contained in the registration submission is complete, true, and correct;

  • the registration(s) reflect a legitimate job offer; and

  • the registrant, or the organization on whose behalf the registration(s) is being submitted, has not worked with, or agreed to work with, another registrant, petitioner, agent, or other individual or entity to submit a registration to unfairly increase chances of selection for the beneficiary or beneficiaries in this submission.

If USCIS finds that this attestation was not true and correct, USCIS will find the registration to not be properly submitted and the prospective petitioner would not be eligible to file a petition based on that registration. USCIS may deny a petition, or revoke a petition approval, based on a registration that contained a false attestation and was therefore not properly submitted.

Furthermore, USCIS may also refer the individual or entity who submitted a false attestation to appropriate federal law enforcement agencies for investigation and further action, as appropriate.



Based on evidence from the FY 2023 and FY 2024 H-1B cap seasons, USCIS has already undertaken extensive fraud investigations, denied and revoked petitions accordingly, and continues to make law enforcement referrals for criminal prosecution.

USCIS believes that the decreased filing rate for FY 2024 H-1B cap petitions is indicative that these investigations are having an impact. 

The H-1B program is an essential part of our nation’s immigration system and our economy, and USCIS is committed to implementing the law and helping meet the ever-changing needs of the U.S. labor market. On Jan. 30, 2024, we announcedfinal rule to strengthen integrity and reduce the potential for fraud in the H-1B registration process, including by ensuring each beneficiary would have the same chance of being selected, regardless of the number of registrations submitted on their behalf. The H-1B Registration final rule makes final some provisions proposed in the Oct. 23, 2023, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM). DHS intends to publish a separate final rule to address the remaining provisions contained in the NPRM. 

Report suspected immigration benefit fraud and abuse to USCIS through our online tip form.

For more information about the H-1B program, visit our H-1B Specialty Occupations webpage.

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